Law & Government & Politics

Where do bills concerning revenue taxes originate start )?

By: Trent FernandezUpdated: March 17, 2021

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The Origination Clause, sometimes called the Revenue Clause, is Article I, Section 7, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution. This clause says that all bills for raising revenue must start in the House of Representatives, but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments as in the case of other bills.

Then, why do revenue bills originate in the House?

The provision was part of a compromise between the large and small states. Smaller states, which would be over-represented in the Senate, would concede the power to originate money bills to the House, where states with larger populations would have greater control.

One may also ask, do bills originate in the House?

BILLS. Article I, Section 7, of the Constitution provides that all bills for raising revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives but that the Senate may propose, or concur with, amendments.

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In the case of presidential impeachment trials, the chief justice of the United States presides. The Constitution requires a two-thirds vote of the Senate to convict, and the penalty for an impeached official upon conviction is removal from office.

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Who can introduce a bill?

2. The Bill is Introduced. When Congress is in session, the Primary Sponsor introduces the bill by placing it in a wooden box called "the hopper.” Here, the bill is assigned a legislative number before the Speaker of the House sends it to a committee.

What are bills of revenue?

The Origination Clause, sometimes called the Revenue Clause, is Article I, Section 7, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution. This clause says that all bills for raising revenue must start in the House of Representatives, but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments as in the case of other bills.

What is Article 1 Section 7 of the Constitution about?

Article I, Section 7 of the Constitution creates certain rules to govern how Congress makes law. Its first Clause—known as the Origination Clause—requires all bills for raising revenue to originate in the House of Representatives.

Do bills go to the House or Senate first?

First, a representative sponsors a bill. The bill is then assigned to a committee for study. If released by the committee, the bill is put on a calendar to be voted on, debated or amended. If the bill passes by simple majority (218 of 435), the bill moves to the Senate.

What can the Senate do to revenue bills?

The Origination Clause, sometimes called the Revenue Clause, is Article I, Section 7, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution. This clause says that all bills for raising revenue must start in the House of Representatives, but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments as in the case of other bills.

Can a bill be passed without the president's signature?

presidential signature - A proposed law passed by Congress must be presented to the president, who then has 10 days to approve or disapprove it. The president signs bills he supports, making them law. Normally, bills he neither signs nor vetoes within 10 days become law without his signature.

Why should the President have a say in which bills become laws?

First, a bill must pass both houses of Congress by a majority vote. After it has passed out of Congress, it is sent along to the President. If the President signs the bill, it becomes law. This is called "overriding a veto," and is difficult to do because of the two-thirds majority requirement.

Which bills must always originate in the House?

The Origination Clause, sometimes called the Revenue Clause, is Article I, Section 7, Clause 1 of the United States Constitution. This clause says that all bills for raising revenue must start in the House of Representatives, but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments as in the case of other bills.

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What is the value of a compromise bill in passing legislation?

What is the value of a compromise bill in passing legislation? It can help legislatures strike an agreement to pass a bill that otherwise might die. How might a bill "die" in committee? If it fails to gain the support of comittee member and be taken to the floor for a vote.

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What three things must happen before a bill may become a law?

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Is a pocket veto?

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What are the 4 options a President has when a bill reaches his desk?

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The War Powers Resolution (also known as the War Powers Resolution of 1973 or the War Powers Act) (50 U.S.C. 1541–1548) is a federal law intended to check the U.S. president's power to commit the United States to an armed conflict without the consent of the U.S. Congress.