Law & Government & Politics

What is the credibility gap related to?

By: Paul LeblancUpdated: March 21, 2021

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Credibility gap is a term that came into wide use with journalism, political and public discourse in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s. At the time, it was most frequently used to describe public skepticism about the Lyndon B. Johnson administration's statements and policies on the Vietnam War.

Accordingly, what was the credibility gap How did the Tet Offensive widen the credibility gap?

It emphasised the credibility gap between what the American public were being told about the war, and what imagery they saw on their televisions.

Also to know, why did Americans disagree about the Vietnam War?

Many Americans opposed the war on moral grounds, appalled by the devastation and violence of the war. Others claimed the conflict was a war against Vietnamese independence, or an intervention in a foreign civil war; others opposed it because they felt it lacked clear objectives and appeared to be unwinnable.

Why did Johnson increase the number of troops in Vietnam?

Why did Johnson increase U.S. troop numbers in Vietnam in 1965? Robert McNamara and Dean Rusk advised him to because they believed the defeat of communism in Vietnam would be vital to the future of America and the world. urged Johnson to send US troops to Vietnam.

What is the living room war?

The Vietnam War (1955–75) was a time of great controversy in the United States. Cold War tensions ran high as the country relentlessly fought against the alleged evils of communism. For the first time in American history, the news from the front lines was brought straight into the living room.

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What was the significance of the Tet Offensive?

The Tet Offensive played an important role in weakening U.S. public support for the war in Vietnam. Ho Chi Minh and leaders in Hanoi planned the Tet Offensive in the hopes of achieving a decisive victory that would end the grinding conflict that frustrated military leaders on both sides.

What happened to Vietnam after the US pullout in 1973?

What happened after the United States withdrew from the war? After the U.S. had withdrawn all its troops, the fighting continued in Vietnam. South Vietnam officially surrendered to communist North Vietnam on April 30, 1975. On July 2, 1976, Vietnam was reunited as a communist country, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.

Why did Americans support the Vietnam War?

Reason three - The Domino Theory
China had become communist in 1949 and communists were in control of North Vietnam. The USA was afraid that communism would spread to South Vietnam and then the rest of Asia. It decided to send money, supplies and military advisers to help the South Vietnamese Government.

What is meant by the silent majority?

The silent majority is an unspecified large group of people in a country or group who do not express their opinions publicly.

How did the war in Vietnam end?

Having rebuilt their forces and upgraded their logistics system, North Vietnamese forces triggered a major offensive in the Central Highlands in March 1975. On April 30, 1975, NVA tanks rolled through the gate of the Presidential Palace in Saigon, effectively ending the war.

Why was the Tet offensive a turning point in the war?

Despite heavy casualties, North Vietnam achieved a strategic victory with the Tet Offensive, as the attacks marked a turning point in the Vietnam War and the beginning of the slow, painful American withdrawal from the region.

What is in the Pentagon Papers?

The Pentagon Papers, officially titled Report of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Vietnam Task Force, is a United States Department of Defense history of the United States' political and military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967.

Who was president during Pentagon Papers?

Under President Harry S. Truman, the U.S. government aided France in its war against the communist-led Viet Minh during the First Indochina War.

What did Nixon mean by Silent Majority?

The term was popularized by U.S. President Richard Nixon in a televised address on November 3, 1969, in which he said, "And so tonight—to you, the great silent majority of my fellow Americans—I ask for your support." In this usage it referred to those Americans who did not join in the large demonstrations against the

Who was involved in Tet Offensive?

U.S. Involvement in the Vietnam War: The Tet Offensive, 1968. In late January, 1968, during the lunar new year (or “Tet”) holiday, North Vietnamese and communist Viet Cong forces launched a coordinated attack against a number of targets in South Vietnam.

What was the Vietnamization plan?

Vietnamization was a policy of the Richard Nixon administration to end U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War through a program to "expand, equip, and train South Vietnamese forces and assign to them an ever-increasing combat role, at the same time steadily reducing the number of U.S. combat troops." Brought on by the

What was the goal of Vietnamization?

Vietnamization was a strategy that aimed to reduce American involvement in the Vietnam War by transferring all military responsibilities to South Vietnam. The increasingly unpopular war had created deep rifts in American society.

What was the impact of the news media during the Vietnam War?

The stories were broadcast as motion pictures shown in theaters. And the newscasters shared only good news and reported bad news with a cheery disposition. Government censorship over the media influenced this outlook—if the press wanted access to stories about the war, they had to receive credentials from the military.