Health & Fitness

What causes AIVR?

By: Tim SpeightUpdated: December 13, 2020

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There are multiple causes of AIVR including:
  • Reperfusion phase of an acute myocardial infarction (= most common cause)
  • Beta-sympathomimetics such as isoprenaline or adrenaline.
  • Drug toxicity, especially digoxin, cocaine and volatile anaesthetics such as desflurane.
  • Electrolyte abnormalities.

Considering this, does AIVR have P waves?

AIVR is a regular rhythm with a wide QRS complex (> 0.12 seconds). P waves may be absent, retrograde (following the QRS complex and negative in ECG leads II, III, and aVF), or independent of them (AV dissociation).

How do you treat Idioventricular rhythm?

Under these situations, atropine can be used to increase the underlying sinus rate to inhibit AIVR. Other treatments for AIVR, which include isoproterenol, verapamil, antiarrhythmic drugs such as lidocaine and amiodarone, and atrial overdriving pacing are only occasionally used today.

Do you shock Idioventricular?

Ventricular tachycardia (v-tach) typically responds well to defibrillation. This rhythm usually appears on the monitor as a wide, regular, and very rapid rhythm. Ventricular tachycardia is a poorly perfusing rhythm; patients may present with or without a pulse.

What does AIVR stand for?

Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) is a ventricular rhythm consisting of three or more consecutive monomorphic beats, with gradual onset and gradual termination. It can rarely manifest in patients with completely normal hearts or with structural heart disease.

Related

What are the 5 lethal cardiac rhythms?

You will learn about Premature Ventricular Contractions, Ventricular Tachycardia, Ventricular Fibrillation, Pulseless Electrical Activity, Agonal Rhythms, and Asystole.

What does Idioventricular mean?

Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is a ventricular rhythm with a rate of between 40 and 120 beats per minute. Idioventricular means “relating to or affecting the cardiac ventricle alone” and refers to any ectopic ventricular arrhythmia. It is also referred to as AIVR and "slow ventricular tachycardia."

Can AIVR be irregular?

Accelerated idioventricular arrhythmias are distinguished from ventricular rhythms with rates less than 40 (ventricular escape) and those faster than 120 (ventricular tachycardia). AIVR is generally considered to be a benign abnormal heart rhythm. It is typically temporary and does not require treatment.

Is torsades VT or VF?

Torsades de Pointes: Frequent PVCs with 'R on T' phenomenon trigger a run of polymorphic VT which subsequently begins to degenerate to VF. This combination of mildly prolonged QTc and frequent PVCs / bigeminy is commonly seen in acute myocardial ischaemia and is high-risk for deterioration to PVT / VF.

What does ventricular pacing look like?

Ventricular paced rhythm:
Ventricular pacing spikes precede each QRS complex (except perhaps complex #2 — although the QRS morphology in this complex is identical to the rest of the ECG, suggesting that this beat is also paced) No atrial pacing spikes are seen.

What is AIVR in cardiology?

Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is a ventricular rhythm with a rate of between 40 and 120 beats per minute. Idioventricular means “relating to or affecting the cardiac ventricle alone” and refers to any ectopic ventricular arrhythmia. It is also referred to as AIVR and "slow ventricular tachycardia."

What is Idioventricular rate in human beings?

Introduction. Idioventricular rhythm is a slow regular ventricular rhythm, typically with a rate of less than 50, absence of P waves, and a prolonged QRS interval.

What is sinus arrhythmia?

Introduction. Sinus arrhythmia is a commonly encountered variation of normal sinus rhythm. Sinus arrhythmia characteristically presents with an irregular rate in which the variation in the R-R interval is greater than 0.12 seconds.

What is accelerated junctional rhythm?

Accelerated Junctional Rhythm Overview
Accelerated junctional rhythm (AJR) occurs when the rate of an AV junctional pacemaker exceeds that of the sinus node. This situation arises when there is increased automaticity in the AV node coupled with decreased automaticity in the sinus node.

What is junctional bradycardia?

Junctional bradycardia (JB) involves cardiac rhythms that arise from the atrioventricular junction at a heart rate of <60/min. The event occurs as enhanced automaticity or as an escape rhythm during significant bradycardia with rates slower than the intrinsic junctional pacemaker [1].

What is a junctional tachycardia?

Junctional tachycardia is a form of supraventricular tachycardia, a type of racing pulse caused by a problem in the area between the upper and lower chambers of your heart. It's known as the atrioventricular node, or AV node.

Is AIVR regular?

Differential diagnosis
AIVR appears similar to ventricular tachycardia with wide QRS complexes (QRS >0.12s) and a regular rhythm. It can most easily be distinguished from VT in that the rate is less than 120 and usually less than 100 bpm.

What does the P wave represent?

The P wave and PR segment is an integral part of an electrocardiogram (ECG). It represents the electrical depolarization of the atria of the heart. It is typically a small positive deflection from the isoelectric baseline that occurs just before the QRS complex.

Is accelerated Idioventricular rhythm harmless?

Accelerated idioventricular rhythm is a ventricular rhythm with a rate of between 40 and 120 beats per minute. AIVR is generally considered to be a benign abnormal heart rhythm. It is typically temporary and does not require treatment.